Monday, October 26, 2015

Taking Our Best Shot at Vaccinating Teen Males against HPV: How Are We Doing?

By: Lewis First, MD, MS; Editor-in-Chief     

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    It’s been four years since human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine was recommended routinely for all adolescent makes.  Just because something is recommended doesn’t mean it is happening—and Lu et al. (doi/10.1542/peds.2015-1631) decided to look at prevalence rates of vaccine administration as well as factors predictive of male vaccination in a new study being released this week in our journal.  
      The authors used data from the 2013 National Immunization Survey of Teens to determine the number of HPV vaccines received teen males and then used multivariable logistic regression analysis to determine key predictors.  The results two years into standard-of-care recommendation for HPV vaccine administration is disappointing to say the least with only a third of makes nationally getting at least one dose of the vaccine and less than 14% getting all three doses.  
       So what factors are associated with an increased risk of being vaccinated and what factors are associated with a reduced risk? The authors make some sharp points in providing plenty of information that awaits your perusal and perhaps your awareness when these factors are identified in your teen male patients to even more insure the vaccine is given.  While the data are two years old, do you think HPV vaccine uptake rates in adolescent makes is as bad as the rates were in 2013?  
       If you practice general primary care pediatrics, share with us how you are faring with getting teen males vaccinated to HPV? Any strategies you find working better than others?  Share your thoughts with us by responding to this blog, sending us an e-letter or posting your comments on our Facebook or Twitter pages.  

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