Tuesday, September 30, 2014

The Role of Parenting & Home Stimulation in Overcoming Cognitive Deficits in Bangladesh

By: Lewis First, MD, MS; Editor-in-Chief 

Bangladeshi children. Photo by Mahmud Rassel via Flickr
Poverty certainly takes its toll on children's health given the association between poverty and cognitive deficit in infancy, but is it possible to improve this deficit with environmental and parental influence?

The answer is a resounding yes according to Hamadani et al. (doi: 10.1542/peds.2014-0694) who performed a longitudinal study of development in more than 2,800 infants in Bangladesh. They followed these infants for IQ changes over their first five years of life as impacted by such factors as parental education and home stimulation by parents. The results are impressive and stress the import of such factors in a way that can be generalizable to our own young patients born into poverty in this country.

To share even more lessons learned from this study, we invited Dr. Andrew Racine (doi: 10.1542/peds.2014-1375) to comment in an accompanying editorial that we are also early releasing this week.

Both the study and commentary are rich in take-aways that will be useful to you and the underserved families you care for.

Related Reading:

No comments:

Post a Comment

Thank you for joining in the conversation. Please follow our commenting guidelines, which you can find on our "About First Read" page.